Live the Adventure: Part 2 (Supplemental)

Day two on the Summit, and I hit the ground running. Much of the work for pharmacy will be completed before the scouts arrive here, and we had to get it done. This day would consist of lots of drug packing and checking. So after a scrumptious camp breakfast, my compatriots and I headed to the pharmacy to hop to it. But on the way we made a quick pit stop. 

Driving back from Echo to Delta we go right past the motor pool, so we swing in to get our credentials to drive on the reservation. These credentials consist of a car shaped punch in the Jamboree ID that we are issued. Upon arrival we wait in line behind some younger staffers and about 15 minutes later we are let into the trailer where the credential checks are taking place. Finally, the line starts moving, and then it stops because of a miscommunication between the staffers, the motor pool and their boss. Anyway, these staffers and the only motor pool guy doing the credentials argue and the rest of us are moved outside, where we wait another 15 minutes before giving up and deciding to return later. Did I say this was gonna be a quick pit stop? I lied. 

Back at the pharmacy we head to work. At this time we only have five of us so we can all fit in the trailer at once. It is cramped but we’re able get the job done. This morning consists of putting together BLS, or Basic Life Support Go bags together so that they are available in the field when needed. Keith had started the night prior but we had to change some of the things due to problems discovered with the Bill of Materials. So the BLS bags were postponed and instead we went to work on Epi kits. Or at least Gary Wright, Pharmacist from Alabama, and I got to work on the Epi kits. I say Epi kits because, since we were unable to secure a donation of EpiPens, we had to package our own EpiPen like kits. To do this we put a blunt canula, a TB syringe, and an epinephrine vail (1mg/mL) in a 4×6 ziploc bag. Then we pasted dosing labels to the outside, and packaged two bags into an 8×10 ziploc and that’s our Epi kits. We made 50 before we took our lunch break. 

After lunch we went back to the motor pool and were in a short line to get our punches. It was about a 10 minute wait and all of us (we brought 3) had our punches and then drove back to Delta Medical. This was the quick trip I mentioned, it just came later than expected. Now was the time to get back to work on those go bags, so Mr. Wright, here on out referred to by his Jamboree name of Les Nessman, and I moved outside where we were to commence filling our BLS bags to the gills. 21 red and safety yello-green bags were stuffed with drugs such as Malox, diphenhydramine, the Epi kits, aspirin, acetaminophen, and others. 

After we filled all the BLS bags, we brought them one trailer over to Med Supply and gave them into the very capable hands of that team, and received the ALS (Advanced Life Support) Go-bags to fill. Thankfully theres only 2 of these and they got filled in short order. Then we went around the camp in a UTV and I toured many an area. I think I’ve got my bearings down but only time will tell. Really cool though, we saw a doe and two fawns up close and personal at Action Point. 

After that it was off to dinner, where I went for the chicken parm sandwich, which turned out to really clear my sinuses. Well, next time I’ll take the rumor on its word and get a different dish. Then dinner was finished and we returned to the pharmacy where I helped to put together a trial code box and tried to find the stability of Ativan in the package insert… to no avail. So I took an invigorating shower and turned in for the night. The adventure will continue. 

~
Martin “Mixy” McNichols
Until we meet again

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